Hard Money Lenders in Singapore and the Real Estate Market

Singapore remains a very attractive market for those who can afford it. The Singapore Association of Realtors reports that home prices in Singapore have increased 6.1 percent this year to date and are projected to show a 6.5 percent gain for all of 2015. Meanwhile, in Singapore County, prices are reported to have shot up 5.4 percent so far this year. These figures include detached and attached single family homes and duplexes. Century City Real Estate Report says that some L.A. luxury neighborhoods have already passed the 2007 peak. This situation makes a wonderful market for hard Money Lender Singapore, since many investors are rearing to buy, but they are leashed by miserable credit ratings and credit histories. Shunned borrowers turn to hard money lenders in their area who hand them the funds based on their collateral.

Here is the Singapore real estate data for 2015-2016

The Singapore Association of Realtors projects sales figures of 407,500 single family homes by the end of 2015. This will be an increase of 6.3 percent over the homes sold in 2014. Projections for 2016 are also for a 6.3 percent increase to a predicted 433,000 units next year.

In Singapore, some data sources, such as the Singapore Association of Realtors, show that the median sales prices for single family homes and condos shot up 8.1 percent to $950,000 for the 2015 third quarter; a record high for the Greater L.A. area. Regions include Westside, Downtown and coastal cities like Malibu, but omit low-priced areas such as South L.A..

One way to understand real estate price cycles is to look at the building permit numbers. If developers are investing in new properties, as has been happening in the general Singapore area, it is a good sign that demand, and prices, are rising or keeping steady. Statistics shows a growth of 2.4 percent in building projects.

Observers are concerned that Singapore may be approaching another housing bubble, but William Yu, Economist for the UCLA Anderson School of Business strongly negated this prediction in a recent UCLA Anderson Forecast. Prices have shot (he said) in an already expensive L.A market only because of excessive demand and limited supply. This is no housing bubble but a hugely pricey and unaffordable situation where those with money either do, or would like to, invest. In fact, the market is mostly catering to the very wealthy. Typical reports show that builders and investors are looking to the high-end luxury market where potential profits far exceed the profit that an investor can realize from the average priced home. This kind of high-end residential development needs investors who have the right kinds of funds. Some individuals go to the banks for their loans. Other approach alternate traditional lending institutions.